Mood Stabilisers

Drug Name:

 

Lithium

 

Carbamazepine

 

Sodium Valproate

 

Lamotrigine

 

Olanzapine

 

Seroquel

 

Drug Class:

 

Natural Mineral

 

Anticonvulsant

 

Anticonvulsant

 

Anticonvulsant

 

Antipsychotic

 

Antipsychotic

 

Drug Name:

 

Lithium

 

Carbamazepine

 

Sodium Valproate

 

 

Lamotrigine

 

 

Olanzapine

 

Seroquel

 

Drug Class:

 

Weight gain, tremor, thirst, nausea

 

Dizziness, blurred vision. nausea

 

Significant weight gain, tremor, nausea, hair loss

 

Drowsiness, dizziness, headaches, blurredvision

 

See 'Antipsychotic Meds'

 

See 'Antipsychotic Meds'

 

Mood stabilisers are a class of medications that work in both acute phases of depression and in phases of elevation to essentially ‘stabilise’ someone’s mood. Mood stabilisers are prescribed for a range of disorders, but are most commonly used to assist people to manage bipolar disorder.  There are different types of mood stabilisers, which are indicated in Table 1 below. Sometimes a drug commonly used to treat another disorder is utilized for its mood stabilizing properties. The most commonly used mood stabilizer is Lithium.

 

 

Table 1. Medication with Mood Stabilising Properties

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are mood stabilisers addictive?

Mood stabilisers are not addictive medications, that is, an individual’s dose of medication will not need to continually increase in order to achieve the same effect. They do change the way people think and feel, so it is likely if someone ceases their medication against recommendations they may experience a relapse of symptoms.

 

 

What are the common side effects?

Table 2 below outlines some of the common side effects someone may experience when taking a mood stabilizer. Something that is not included is that extensive use of Lithium can cause kidney damage in the long term. This is because our body does not metabolise Lithium very well, and as such our kidneys are put under great stress to eliminate Lithium from the body.

 

 

 

Table 2. Common side effects of Mood Stabilisers (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keep in mind that different side effects will present for different people. Generally speaking, a higher dose of medication is more likely to induce side effects. It is really important to consider how the side effects of a consumer’s medication may impact your role as an exercise physiology student – will this influence goal setting? How might this impact your client’s ability to engage in your exercise prescription? 

Another thing to consider is how you might use the information you have to educate consumers about the side effects of their medication.

 

 

Specific Medications: Mood Stabilisers

There are lots of different medications that patients may be on. This list below includes some of the mood stabilisers that your clients may be on. Click on the hyperlinks below for specific information about individual medications.

 

First generation Antipsychotics:

 

 

References:

 

  1. Rethink Mental Illness (2015) , Mood Stabilisers factsheet                                                               Available from: https://www.google.com.au/url?   sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=5&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CDQQFjAEahUKEwj_5avfvvrIAhVJi5QKHU-CBqo&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.rethink.org%2Fresources%2Fm%2Fmood-stabilisers-factsheet&usg=AFQjCNHPhsfDWlPH4uiPe1yGsCLgGYdfJg&sig2=XoGvupfvMknuU8WG8gCPDA (accessed on 10/11/2015)

  2. http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/healthadvice/treatmentswellbeing/medicationsbipolardisorder.aspx (accessed on 10/11/2015)